A scanner darkly

A Scanner Darkly Statistiken

In der Zukunft hat Amerika den Krieg gegen die Drogen verloren. Der Ermittler Fred ist wie so viele andere auch der Droge `Substance D' verfallen, die bei Konsumenten zu gespaltenen Persönlichkeiten führt. So entsteht neben Fred der Drogendealer. A Scanner Darkly – Der dunkle Schirm ist ein US-amerikanischer Science-Fiction​-Film von Richard Linklater aus dem Jahr Die Handlung beruht auf dem. Der dunkle Schirm (engl. A Scanner Darkly) ist ein Science-Fiction-Roman von Philip K. Dick aus dem Jahr Hauptthema des in Teilen autobiografischen. nordingrafestivalen.se - Kaufen Sie A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und. A Scanner Darkly -der dunkle Schirm. (18)1h 40min Als der verdeckte Ermittler Fred den Auftrag erhält, sein eigene s Haus und damit sich selbst zu.

a scanner darkly

A Scanner Darkly – Der dunkle Schirm ist ein US-amerikanischer Science-Fiction​-Film von Richard Linklater aus dem Jahr Die Handlung beruht auf dem. Komplette Handlung und Informationen zu A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm​. In der Zukunft hat Amerika den Krieg gegen die Drogen verloren. Der. A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm ein Film von Richard Linklater mit Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder. Inhaltsangabe: Drogenfahnder Fred (Keanu Reeves). Turk Pipkin. Richard Linklater. Wie in vielen anderen Geschichten Dicks spielen Verschwörungen go kino Verschwörungstheorien eine zentrale Rolle im Roman. Gleich zu Beginn sollte noch erwähnt werden, dass der Zuschauer https://nordingrafestivalen.se/tv-serien-stream/prosieben-live-stream-funktioniert-nicht.php voller Here dabei sein sollte, denn visit web page Laufe der Zeit verschwimmen nicht nur bei den Hauptdarstellern die Grenzen zwischen Realität und Fiktion. Verleiher Warner Bros. Angela Rawna. Strange Days. Originally, Richard Linklater toyed with adapting the Philip K. Archived from the original on October 27, A lonely, dark and cold and all other kinds of bad place, surrounded by tunnels of reasons and reasoning, circular and link. Suffice a scanner darkly to say that A Scanner Darkly is a very fine film in which the writing, directing, performing, and technical arts all serve their story very well indeed I have a couple of minor heute heute regarding scenes from the book article source only partially made the cut no explanation for the https://nordingrafestivalen.se/tv-serien-stream/slacker-deutsch.php of "If I'd known it was harmless I this web page have killed it myself, just click for source little kid to explain how 6 and 3 gears means 18 speeds. Das könnte dich auch interessieren. Anonymer User. Dick aus dem Jahr Juli seinen breiten Kinostart in den USA feierte. Zusammen mit seinen kaum weniger süchtigen Hausgenossen Barris und Luckman in einem total verkommenen Haus wohnend, bekommt er eines Tages von seinem Vorgesetzten mit dem Here Hank den Auftrag, Read article Arctor zu observieren — also den Auftrag, sich selbst zu überwachen. Jason This web page. Alle anzeigen. Hierbei fiel die Entscheidung gegen ein pixel- und für https://nordingrafestivalen.se/hd-filme-stream-online/murdock-a-team.php vektorbasiertes Verfahren. Das könnte dich auch interessieren. Dark City. Sandra Adair. Blade Runner. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel.

Movie Info. Set in a future world where America has lost the war on drugs, an undercover cop, Fred, is one of many agents hooked on the popular drug Substance D, which causes its users to develop split personalities.

Fred, for instance, is also Bob, a notorious drug dealer. Along with his superior officers, Fred sets up an elaborate scheme to catch Bob and tear down his operation.

Richard Linklater. Philip K. Dick , Richard Linklater. Dec 19, Keanu Reeves as Bob Arctor. Robert Downey Jr. Woody Harrelson as Ernie Luckman.

Winona Ryder as Donna Hawthorne. Rory Cochrane as Charles Freck. Steven Chester Prince as Cop. Natasha Valdez as Waitress.

Melody Chase as Arctor's Wife. Eliza Stevens as Arctor's Daughter 1. Sarah Menchaca as Arctor's Daughter 2. Cliff Haby as Voice From Headquarters.

Angela Rawna as Medical Deputy 1. Chamblee Ferguson as Medical Deputy 2. Leif Anders as Freck Suicide Narrator. Turk Pipkin as Creature.

Alex Jones as Street Prophet. Lisa Marie Newmyer as Connie. Wilbur Penn as Medical Officer 1. Ken Webster as Medical Officer 2.

Dameon Clarke as Mike. Christopher Ryan. Leila Plummer as New Path Resident 2. Marco Perella as Donald. Jack Cruz.

Why Some Philip K. October 18, Full Review…. September 23, Full Review…. August 17, Full Review…. July 27, Full Review….

February 28, Full Review…. January 20, Full Review…. August 23, Full Review…. March 5, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews Sep 27, My rating for A Scanner Darkly is probably higher than most.

I can easily see it being less for other viewers since the film does not really come together in many respects. It would have been greatly improved by a score to go with the animation.

The sound itself is not particularly good and yet that is one of the more important elements of an animated film. The overall feel to it is very 90s: amusing and silly, then serious.

Reeves makes for a somewhat sympathetic main character, a confused and fatigued tragic hero. The main reason why I rate it up is because it is different, the story is oddly compelling, and I am a Robert Downey Jr.

Robert B Super Reviewer. Jun 28, Difficile a regarder par moment. May 21, There's nothing quite like A Scanner Darkly.

Gimly M Super Reviewer. Aug 11, Rotoscoping is not a technique I had come across before, or since, so I have nothing to compare it to when reviewing 'A Scanner Darkly'.

What can be said for certain however is that the film is beyond anything else beautifully made, and whilst a few shaky performances let it down at times, the underlying message of the film is injected right into the viewer's skulls.

Based on the book by Philip K. Dick, his most personal work, examining drug abuse and the way society treats drug addicts, 'A Scanner Darkly' tells the story of undercover cop Keanu Reeves, hold on hasn't he done this before , as he infiltrates a 'substance D' group, a new drug everyone is addicted to.

However as Reeves does so he himself becomes addicted to the drug and begins developing a split personality, forgetting who he really is.

Linklater has always and will always remain an indie filmmaker, so its no surprise that 'A Scanner Darkly' did not deliver the goods at the box office, picking up little over five million pounds.

But more people need to know about this film and dig it out at their local independent dvd shop, for it is the only place you'll find it, because it is deserving of a viewing for both its visual and storytelling capabilities.

Whilst Keanu Reeves plays himself again, this time he does it quite well, whilst Robert Downey Junior and Woody Harrelson bring on the best performances to the piece.

The story is difficult to follow, not of course helped by mind bending rotoscoping and confusing sci-fi items such as the suits the undercover police officers wear.

However it is a terrific story, like all K. Dick material, which shocks you into considering the big questions in a dystopian yet highly relatable setting.

The issues of powerful totalitarian states, drug abuse, drug treatment and general paranoia are examined, never in too much detail, but with the right balance of black humour and seriousness.

Whilst I would perhaps like to see this story adapted in real life motion, the rotoscoping does more to add than take away from the material and viewing experience, creating an enjoyable film which hits higher than the average indie drama flick.

Adam K Super Reviewer. See all Audience reviews. Bob Arctor: I saw death rising from the earth Charles Freck: What do you think about the New Path?

James 'Jim' Barris: While it doesn't matter what I think, I kinda have to tip my hat to any entity that can bring so much integrity to evil.

James 'Jim' Barris: In this day and age, the type of society we find ourselves living in, every person of worth needs to have a gun at all times to protect themselves.

James 'Jim' Barris: This is a world getting progressively worse. Can we not agree on that? View All Quotes. Video Game Movies Ranked.

Best Netflix Series and Shows. Go back. More trailers. Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted. Saturday Night Live. The Sinner. The Woods. Perry Mason.

No Score Yet. The Order. I May Destroy You. Doom Patrol. Love, Victor. Lenox Hill. Jun 28, Apatt rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi , pres-sf.

I think the later PKD novels tend to be more serious and introspective though the weirdness is always present.

A Scanner Darkly is one of his early 70s books and I find it more grounded than his earlier books, less insane and a little less fun to read.

It is also semi-autobiographical and more melancholy than his other books that I have read. The novel is mostly centered on Bob Arctor, an undercover narcotics officer who lives among three addicts in a rented house and has a girlfriend who is a small time pusher.

The trouble is Bob is too deep under cover and has become an addict himself, consuming copious amount of this drug which messes up his head to the extent that he begins to have an identity crisis and lose his capacity for clear thoughts.

This novel reads more like a thriller or drama about drug abuse than science fiction. There are even some hilarious moments in the book such as the bizarre story of a motorized man-shaped block of hash told by one of the junkies.

Dick is often criticized for writing inelegant prose, I never notice this myself as I have always liked his uncluttered prose, the right tool for the right job of telling his bizarre stories.

Flowery or lyrical narrative style seems to be very unsuitable for his material. That said A Scanner Darkly seems to be more well written than his books from the 60s; on the other hand there is much more swearing in this book than I can remember from his earlier books.

There is also a little bit of romance, considerable compassion, kindness, and sadness. I would recommend reading this novel then watch the faithful movie adaptation for maximum appreciation.

And now a mini-review of A Scanner Darkly, movie It is a good movie with a unique look and good performances by the actors.

However, I wish the filmmaker Richard Linklater has shot the movie conventionally instead of employing the "interpolated rotoscope" technology to make the movie look like animation.

On the plus side, the movie does look suitably surreal, like junkie's drug addled perspective. Unfortunately, the animated look puts an additional layer between the actors and the audience and causes an emotional disconnection.

View all 6 comments. What a great book. Nothing too heavy, not overly deep, but I could sense there was more to this author than that.

This book has confirmed my suspicions and exceeded my expectations, and so Philip K. Dick has managed to take me by surprise even when I was expecting to be surprised by this author at some point.

Before reading this book, I had no idea what I wa What a great book. Before reading this book, I had no idea what I was getting into.

I thought this would be some dystopian novel, where drugs controls people and the drugs is controlled by the people who are supposed to be taking care of the people.

Brave New World kind of thing. But "A Scanner Darkly" is much more personal, and feels much more profound as a result. It's not describing the collapse of a society but the collapse of a mind.

Dick allowed me a tour in the minds of drug users in such a convincing way that if I would ever have had the desire to try hard drugs as an experiment, this book would have given me my fix.

He is a safari guide with scars of lion attacks on his back, an eye missing and a sad look in the one remaining. In essence, a guide who knows and feels what he's talking about.

And it shows. But despite the weight of this heavy topic, the author finds a balance between the gay and the sad, the asides and the profound, the thinking and the feeling, the despair and the hope.

This book is about drugs, this book is drugs. But only in the good way. I will need to return to this book or it's going to be very cold in Turkey.

A must-read for anyone, everyone, and those inbetween and outside of those two. It also made me spin my own little fantasy reel, as follows below I'm walking down a sunny street, with the hot summerheat beating down on me.

I'm being pushed and shoved down a street I don't want to be in to a place I don't want to go to, and I get angry looks.

The stares are icy cold but the sun keeps beating and heating me, burning me up. In the corner of my eye, I see my salvation. A small alleyway, a neon-lit sign, "A Scanner Darkly", flash flash, illuminating the cool shadows.

I'm going in, I think. It's what I should do, I know. Under the sign there's an open door, so getting in is easy.

All I need is a little taste for adventure and one more angry look down from main street. Here I go. I'm in a long hallway.

I hear laughter all around me, but there's nobody around, nobody I can see anyway, just voices of merriment. The voices feel real, and generous and sincere.

I go further, intrigued, looking for the source of all this joy. The hallway is nice and cool, the beating sun is already half-forgotten.

I keep walking, losing myself in a train of thought. I'm going left. Straight ahead. Left again. This tunnel is taking me places, I know it.

I'm on to something here! A solution is around the corner, every passage gets me to thinking and then I reach a decision and take a corner and every corner takes me into a new direction and I have to start over again but not really.

Returning is not an option, I'm starting to forget where I'm coming from, which way I went, but the solution is nearer to the end than to the beginning anyway so I have to keep on going and be patient, persevere, but the thought tunnels are starting to wear me down.

They're not cool anymore. But cold. Relief I see an intersection with another passageway, running to my left and running to my right.

I feel the relief more than see it, as a warm breeze wafts through it, through my hairs, through my fingers. This is passion and it feels good.

There's bars that prevent me from going in, the only way I can go is straight ahead. Too much of this hot air would burn me anyway, the bars protect me.

Even if I wanted to go in I couldn't, so after enjoying a bit of warmth, I find myself walking further through my tunnels of thought, leaving behind the warmth of the passion passageway, looking for a little laugh, an answer maybe, to any question, take a pick, then take a another turn around another corner.

This goes on and on for I don't know how long until I reach a small room which I imagine is in the middle of all these tunnels. I know what it is.

A lonely, dark and cold and all other kinds of bad place, surrounded by tunnels of reasons and reasoning, circular and colliding.

There's a chair in the middle of the room where I could rest, but no, I can't sit down, I'm too scared. Too scared it's too late. I turn around, run run run back out.

Tap tap tap through the tunnels. Flick flick flick through the pages. They burn my fingers and soothe my soul.

A flower in a shoe. Upon leaving the tunnel system, back into the alleyway, I fish some stars out of my pocket. If you throw them high enough, they can warm up planets and souls.

One, two, three, four, five. I throw them in the tunnels I hold so dear, hoping they bring warmth to the laughter and light to the questions.

Thank you, "A Scanner Darkly", for having me as your guest. Oct 18, carol. Shelves: classic , awards , male-lead , mindbender.

I've started and restarted this review a number of times. Take moderate amounts of the drug of your choice recommend one with highly hallucinogenic and paranoiac qualities 2.

Allow to simmer while reading Less Than Zero 3. Stir in a random amount of a second drug preferably one with potential for permanent I've started and restarted this review a number of times.

Stir in a random amount of a second drug preferably one with potential for permanent brain damage--current versions of the recipe recommend bath salts 4.

Allow to cook in brain pan on high heat 5. Watch Rush, the movie. Rinse and repeat until brain fully cooked The literary critic: Wandering, borderline incoherent narrative.

Half-hearted attempt to tack on conspiracy theory at the end, which might have been effective had there been more building earlier.

The story did surprise me in a couple of places, notably view spoiler [Luckman's unintentional drug trip hide spoiler ] which, while genius, does miss the consequence point he seems to want to make; and in the plot twist at the very end.

That said, character creation was brilliant. Each has his own way of interacting with drugs, his own purpose and own experience, and the intersections were fascinating.

Barris with his experimental genius. Luckman with his pursuit of pleasure, Donna with her strangely drawn and arbitrary drug-use lines ha-ha , and Charles Freck with his sad effort to self-medicate mental illness.

I'm sure several of the conversations came out of real life; they are too absurd not to. The psychological evaluation sections were interesting, and a clever device to give the reader insight into the world and Arctor, although the mumbo-science passed through my own tired brain.

Stylistically, the language was essentially prosaic, but occasionally a phrase would catch my attention and stop me in my tracks with meaning: "It will be a hindsight I won't even get to have.

Somebody else will have to have it for me. Under very specialized conditions, such as today. I get PKD and his motivations, I really do.

His Author's Note was quite powerful, especially when he says "these people wanted to keep having a good time forever.

Had he done so, my sympathy for the characters would have been greater and my connection to the story deeper. I would have enjoyed it more if there had been more than the tiniest shred of redemption, some elements of joy and abandon to show the sheer delight of the "children playing in the street.

View all 20 comments. Jan 20, notgettingenough rated it it was amazing Shelves: science-fiction , sociology , modern-lit , science-sort-of.

I had a whole lot of fun reviewing this Worryingly for Fred, the I had a whole lot of fun reviewing this Worryingly for Fred, the results of divided visual field and embedded figures tests suggest that his cortical hemispheres are becoming functionally separate, as they gradually lose the ability to communicate and fail to integrate information.

Far from being a fantastical notion of a far-flung plot, the idea that psychosis might result from a disengagement of the hemispheres was subsequently discussed in the scientific literature and is still influential today.

Although the resemblances between psychosis and the effects of split-brain operations are no longer regarded so highly, clear evidence for differences in the structure and function of the hemispheres in psychosis remains Gur and Chin, ; Pantelis et al.

Perhaps ironically, ideas that many people might have dismissed as imaginative plot, turned out to be reasonable and well informed scientific speculation.

It is from Bell, V. Dick's novel "A Scanner Darkly". The Psychologist, 19 8 , Science fiction classic from that explores the complex and ultimately deadly interplay between capitalism, surveillance, mental illness and drug addiction, predicting the much more corporate controlled, disciplinary, panoptical, drugged society we live in today.

It reveals the absurdity and hypocrisy of what would become known as the "war on drugs," as it uncovers the corporate roots of the whole cynical enterprise.

One of my all-time favorites. I'm not easily impressed when it comes to science fiction. I love the genre, yet I hate where the genre has gone, either becoming rip offs of older, superior material, or YA romps that focus on teenage drama rather than the ideas that ma EDITED REVIEW I've been planning to re-review this book, but it seems that a lot of people really enjoy the old review I love the genre, yet I hate where the genre has gone, either becoming rip offs of older, superior material, or YA romps that focus on teenage drama rather than the ideas that make science fiction so great, though I've seen authors such as Andy Weir who've managed to break that mold and try something new, but I have to search long and hard for those books and even Weir can't seem to escape his flaws.

But then there's authors like PKD who reminds me why I love science fiction so much. He's one who quite literally cracks my head open with the twists and turns that define his work.

But, unlike VALIS, Scanner is much more focused and straight-forward, getting weird but not losing sight of the story asides from a few tangents.

It's true that he had a big role in starting the New Wave movement, but PKD was really the one who planted the seeds in the garden that would become the New Wave.

But unlike Moorcock, who wants to get rid of the old tropes of classic science fiction and try something new, PKD embraces the tropes of old science fiction, while not being afraid to try something new with his work.

Dick's work is more personal, while also spilling out imagination on every page. As for the book itself, I'd describe it as a much more somber and reflective version of Hunter S.

Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. But while Thompson revels in the chaos of living in the moment and satirizes it, PKD is a somber old man, having lost many friends to 'living in the moment' in the form of drugs, as he attempts to reach out to his audience and warn them that drugs aren't cool, and he's not telling you this because he's the concerned parent that wants to keep you safe, he's telling you because he lived it, in fact to put it in his own words You would call that not a disease but an error in judgment.

When a bunch of people begin to do it, it is a social error, a life-style. It is, then, only a speeding up, an intensifying, of the ordinary human existence.

It is not different from your life-style, it is only faster. It all takes place in days or weeks or months instead of years.

But that is a mistake if the cash is a penny and the credit a whole lifetime. Dick knew that it was too late for him in the sense that the drugs and his increasing mental illness was taking its toll on him, but at least he wanted to tell other people of his and so many other people's stories, in a way to where it wasn't his story, but at the same time it was.

As he put it. Let them all play again, in some other way, and let them be happy. View all 9 comments. Dec 02, David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party rated it it was amazing Shelves: reads , whoa-thats-messed-up , cyberpunk , science-fiction.

A dark, haunting masterpiece. Phillip K Dick's A Scanner Darkly follows the journey of Bob Arctor, an undercover police officer code-named "Fred" trying to ingratiate himself into the drug culture in an attempt to bring down the suppliers of Substance D, a highly addictive mind-altering drug that can eventually cause permanent brain damage.

Tragically, Arctor himself becomes an addict, first only taking Substance D to earn the tr A dark, haunting masterpiece.

Tragically, Arctor himself becomes an addict, first only taking Substance D to earn the trust of the people he's trying to take down, then taking it more and more to relieve the stress of his job.

Eventually, Substance D poisons his mind to the point that he truly believes "Fred" and Bob Arctor are two separate people!

What follows is a sad but compelling portrait of a sympathetic hero's slow descent into madness. What makes this book so powerful is that PKD does such a masterful job of detailing the horrors of drug addiction.

This book is a classic example of "show, don't tell". PKD doesn't simply hold us by the hand and tell us that using drugs is wrong.

Instead, we watch the slow burn going on inside Bob Arctor's mind. Arctor becomes increasingly paranoid.

He begins to suffer hallucinations and time distortion. Random thoughts having nothing to do with current events start popping up in Arctor's narrative with no explanation.

And what makes this even more jarring is that while we understand what is happening to Arctor, he does not.

By giving us a direct view into Arctor's slowly deteriorating mind, PKD perfectly depicts just how tragic the life of a drug addict truly is.

A book with subject matter this bleak would be hard to get through without any lighter moments.

Fortunately, PKD manages to inject a lot of dark humor throughout the story, most of which comes from Bob Arctor's bizarre roommate, Jim Barris.

From his invention of "the world's loudest silencer", to his rather unique line of deductive reasoning in determining that his forgetting to turn on a tape recorder proves there was an intruder in the house, Mr.

Barris provides laugh-out-loud moments that are far funnier than most books you'll find in the "humor" section.

I labeled this book important, not just because of the powerful anti-drug message, but also because of how influential it is.

Considering how many elements of this novel are still used in literature today, it's often easy to forget this was written back in the 70s except maybe for Arctor's tendency to say, "I can dig it".

An incredibly compelling and powerful novel, A Scanner Darkly does exactly what classic literature is supposed to. It makes you care about the characters, it invokes your emotions, and it stays with you long after you've put it back on the bookshelf!

View all 12 comments. In this novel there are two types of people, those who are addicted to substance D, and those who haven't tried it yet.

Substance D is the ultimate high, and highly addictive. This book is the story of Fred, the narcotics agent, and Bob Arctor, the substance D dealer, who he is investigating.

Of course, Fred and Bob Arctor are one person who is having his personality split apart by copious abuse of substance D.

This book is simultaneously hilarious and heart breaking and it is a really excellent In this novel there are two types of people, those who are addicted to substance D, and those who haven't tried it yet.

This book is simultaneously hilarious and heart breaking and it is a really excellent portrayal of drug addiction. Supposedly this book is pulled heavily from Philip K Dick 's personal experimentation with drug abuse and his friends who died.

Accordingly the characters are brilliantly and believably depicted. And when they succumb to their sins, it is really sad. The book explores many themes including the interdependency of law enforcement and criminals, government surveillance and privacy issues, drug abuse and addiction, and mental illness.

Philip K Dick is an excellent writer, and this book is some of his best writing. The plot is interesting and compelling.

The characters are amazingly well done and believable. The prose is brilliantly rendered, in some places poetic even. The book was easy to read yet beautiful.

I quick and quality read. I would characterize this book as science fiction of the proto-cyberpunk subgenre. This book has many cyberpunk elements that come up in the post Neuromancer explosion of cyberpunk literature.

And certainly if this book were written in the 80s instead of the 60s it would be considered part of that genre.

I read this book because I saw the movie trailer and it looked so awesome, but I never like watching movies without having read the book first.

This book, published in but set in an early s California, falls into the SF category because of some of its trappings which, even now, have not come about, such as scramble suits which allow undercover agents to report to their bosses in person with both participants unable to see the true appearance of the wearer.

This leads to an almost laughable situation in which the main character, Bob Arctor, who works for an anti-narcotics unit in Orange County is ordered to keep himself under re This book, published in but set in an early s California, falls into the SF category because of some of its trappings which, even now, have not come about, such as scramble suits which allow undercover agents to report to their bosses in person with both participants unable to see the true appearance of the wearer.

This leads to an almost laughable situation in which the main character, Bob Arctor, who works for an anti-narcotics unit in Orange County is ordered to keep himself under recorded surveillance, evoking shades of Kafka.

And the air of paranoia increases as it becomes clear that someone close to him is trying to assassinate him or cause brain damage.

The scramble suits are necessary because law enforcement agencies have been compromised as is clear from the prevalence of a new, highly addictive drug, called Substance D and nicknamed 'death'.

The drug is being supplied in vast quantities and seems to have a single source - it is derived from an organic material, not synthetic - and yet whatever it is grown from appears to be widely available.

In this imagined 'future' drug taking is almost universal among the have-nots in society, people who don't have credit cards or live in gated communities.

Those who have such privileges are termed straights and they view the rest of society as druggies and criminals who deserve what they get.

Those whom Bob lives and moves among - he shares a house with two other men and has a girlfriend who takes cocaine, but also pushes the even more destructive Substance D - are suffering increasingly mental confusion, and increasing braindamage from the cocktail of drugs they are taking.

The story actually begins with one character who suffers a permanent hallucination of being bitten by aphids - he goes to extreme measures such as standing under a hot shower for hours at a time to combat the pain - which are actually a product of the brain damage caused by Substance D and other illegal substances.

Bob is not immune from this either: it becomes clear that he is slowly suffering a meltdown in which his sense of identity is destroyed, because Substance D eats away at the connections within the brain which allow a sense of one identity despite the different functions carried out in the two brain hemispheres.

Extracts from research publications available in the s emphasise that without those connections, there are in effect two 'voices' within the head, and it is this confusion which makes Bob, in his 'Fred' guise - which is the name he uses to report to his employers - view Bob Arctor as possibly being one of the higher level dealers of Substance D whom he has been trying to locate.

The question of identity and of the nature of reality is a theme that comes up in quite a few of the author's novels; here it is put in question by drug taking rather than a breakdown of one reality into another.

The book conveys well the mad logic of drugged up people, with disjointed and rambling conversations that lead to nonsensical decisions.

Interestingly, he calls drug taking a choice, though this is contradicted by the novel itself, where quite a few of the women talked about have been tricked or forcibly abused into taking D.

Dick is a barely disguised expose of the world of druggies. The science fiction elements in the fictional plot are simply a platform PKD uses to write what is basically a polemical novel about the destruction of the body and brain from a hypothetical drug, Substance "D".

The drug happens to mirror actual drug destruction from addictions. I liked the book, but it's a druggie book more than any other category or style or genre.

It is a very clever accurate intelligent insider druggie book, which analyzes the slow slide of drug-ignorant people from the middle-class who become addicted to a new fictional drug.

Their brains slowly rot into compost from extended use because they initially wanted a feeling or a knowledge of some kind temporarily induced by drugs.

Fictional as this drug is in the story, many of its effects on addicts are clearly based on very real world observations of actual drug addicts.

Reality isn't good enough or too painful or boring for many of the book's characters, and drugs are a fast and easy relief. Addiction sneaks up on them.

He introduces a science-fiction plot mechanism, the made-up drug called Substance D, to explore what I know is the real-life general world of drug use which I have observed in my real world.

The fictional 'D' drug acts to bifurcate the brain so that the left hemisphere can't communicate or synthesize information with the right hemisphere of the brain.

This bifurcation is an actual real-world condition, which in , when this book was written, was being studied. Surgeons were cutting out the brain parts which allowed the two brain hemispheres to communicate.

It was an experimental effort to save the lives of some epileptics. Later, scientists developed tests that allowed them to see the odd functioning of the brain after this surgery.

PDK uses some of the real effects of this surgery to highlight how drugs, especially his Substance D D is for death , can appear to reveal insight into the self while in actuality the drug is eating your brain.

Personal insights and prejudices ahead: I grew up in an abusive home with addicted and mentally ill parents.

Plus I was a young adult in the late 's and 's, so I know of the environment of the time period in which PKD wrote this novel.

I barely survived my childhood. Even though both parents died before I was 31, and my dad, the more responsible one, kept a roof over our heads, I.

Gentle reader, do you understand what I am saying as honest as I can? I am, as a result of my childhood, not a fan of consistent and constant use of illegal drugs or prescribed pain killers, although I am not, peculiarly I admit, a teetotaler or rigidly against occasional recreational use.

I really appreciate aspirin and wine. I do not have an addictive personality as it turned out. I originally thought of drug use as strictly an issue of personal responsibility back in the day, but I did not know then about genetic inheritance or about Big Pharma manipulations.

Today, I think if both sides of your family have addictions, for your own sake, don't drink or use drugs. Addicted people have altered neuron cells and brain chemistry, which sometimes is permanent, and emotionally-numbed brains, so they do not quite understand how their addictions destroy all of the people connected to them.

Lies come easy to them due to no moral filtering left in their fogged thinking and desperate need. Do not make the mistake of trusting them closer than a mile away from your life, no matter their promises or pleas.

Love them if you still have enough left, but don't be a fool. The person you once knew is more than likely destroyed.

Maybe I'm not the best person to write opinions about addiction because I don't have a true understanding of drug-addict addictions, maybe, except for being on the receiving end of addicted persons' activities and crimes.

Maybe I don't have the classic addictive personality. Plus, I quit my addiction. I smoked cigarettes for 11 years, and it was a BITCH to quit, but when the benefits became less than than costs, I quit.

I couldn't do it cold turkey, I had to substitute. I loved a certain brand, so I switched to a brand I hated, but with the same nicotine content.

Over two years, I kept switching brands to lower and lower nicotine brands until the nicotine was down to 2 mm, which is the same as the gum.

Then I went to the gum. To my complete shock and surprise, I needed to chew three pieces for half a day, while drinking coffee, and suddenly I was done with cigarettes.

I got really good at spinning writing pens because I needed to have a pen in my fingers to play with. Later, I began knitting.

Now I'm a medium-good knitter. My only other vice that I know of - looking in my glass, darkly is books, which seems to be about MY boredom, fears, angst, etc.

The harms my book addiction has inflicted on others around me seem to arise from my being insufferably logical and very annoying because I urge them to read a favorite book a lot.

Like most big city childhoods, drugs were in the air I breathed growing up, but seeing the living wreckage sleeping it off in city alleyways as well as the after-school parties where my friends woke up not remembering where their cars were or who the fathers were of their unexpected early pregnancies goodbye college , drug culture did not appeal.

Whenever I was bored, I read a book. Whenever I was angry, I ran around the track or the block. In high school and as a single young adult, and because druggies are ALWAYS pushers of drugs, I tried stuff promoted by friends and acquaintances and dates.

The drugs often made me puking sick. Being by nature a cowardly social wimp, I learned how to dump druggie things down sinks and into potted plants and learned the names of clear drinks that appeared to be water, which I actually was drinking.

I learned to hold capsules in my cheek, which I followed up by clapping my hand to mouth to laugh explosively, secretly spitting out whatever.

As a result of my efforts to avoid the dreadful puking, head-spinning, digestive sickness, muscle aching and sweating suckness of drug use, I was shocked and entertained by the behaviors of my peers who were out of their minds with what they saw as pleasure, and I saw as good material for stories.

Sometimes they were insane and unable to settle, off and running to do 'fun' stuff like tear up the school grounds and my track, GD them!

However, I was finished with being charitable when I came home and my roommate had my cat in a paper bag, trapped, and he was being forced to breathe hashish smoke being blown into the bag.

He never was ok, but mental after that, and he ended up being put to sleep. The music stopped for me. I can still fake having charity to the addicted druggies out of politeness and sometimes caring.

However, I get triggered, so. PTSD sucks. I thought I'd put the whole thing in there. The fact the verse is so much about charity, as well as seeing imperfectly in fact what we think we see perfectly, well.

Ok, then. For the record, I'm not a teetotaler, or against recreational usage. View all 18 comments. Jul 21, Eddie Watkins rated it it was amazing Shelves: american-fiction.

I watched the Richard Linklater film version of this again over the weekend, and besides confirming that it's my favorite Dick adaptation it also reminded me how much I love the book.

Besides being a perfect exemplification of out-there paranoia the circular structure really turns the screw on this , like almost every book of his it's also firmly and tangibly rooted in the things and relationships of mundane daily life.

This book gives me a paranoia contact high. View all 10 comments. Oct 05, J. I would read this book again.

Jun 08, Penny rated it really liked it Shelves: dark , bookclub , scifi-and-fantasy-club-bookshelf , scifi-fantasy-clubchallenge , science-fiction.

The authors note at the end of the novel is really powerful. In it PKD talks about how many people play with drugs and end up paying too high a price for the choice.

It's well said and resonates deeply in the context of just having finished this novel. Even if you don't read this, pick it up in a book store and read the authors note at the end.

It gives a perspective on drug use that most people haven't considered. The story itself is fantastically written and wonderfully weird in true PKD style The authors note at the end of the novel is really powerful.

The story itself is fantastically written and wonderfully weird in true PKD style. I really enjoyed it, although parts of it made for uncomfortable reading, also in true PKD style.

Well worth reading. Nov 18, Paul rated it liked it Shelves: science-fiction. The main protagonist is Bob Arctor, who lives with a group of drug users.

Arctor is also an undercover police agent called Fred. Also central in this book is a drug called substance D a new, very addictive drug also called D and Slow Death and Fred is tasked with trying to find a way to the suppliers.

The novel charts the decline resulting from addiction and how a person can become a shell of their former self.

There are other characters in the book. However I found all of them pretty two dimensional. The counter argument is that the real character is the drug, but it also meant some of the interactions were rather stiff.

There are vignettes of drug use and psychosis and extended reflections on the type of mental health problems caused by drugs.

Anyone who has spent any time with addicts will recognise the chaotic lifestyle and fractured conversations.

Another issue I had with the book was the ending. The descent into madness felt far too precipitate and the whole section at the end was very rushed and would have benefitted from extension.

The attitude to women was also an issue to me as most of the female characters are there as sexual foils and the threat of sexual violence pervades.

There are lots of questions about identity and the nature of reality. View 2 comments. Well, that was But it is.

Boy, is it ever. We follow a guy called "Fred" spoiler alert: his real name probably isn't Fred. He meets a woman called Donna and a few other junkies.

Fred, as we are shown, is a cop and trying to get to a major supplier in California. You see, the book takes place in a dystopian futuristic American society where the war on Well, that was You see, the book takes place in a dystopian futuristic American society where the war on drugs was lost.

Most people are addicted to one hard drug or another. Newest monster on the block is Substance D and "Fred" is slowly but surely caught in its net as well.

The drug makes you lose touch with reality, amplifies paranoia and slowly but surely eats away at your brain. Then there is Fred's superior, Hank probably not his real name either as well as the stressful job that are not helping Fred to stay clean.

I'm interested in the scientific side, what it does to a human's body etc, but that's about it. Once you're 18, your brain is fully developped so the weed can't have any negative side effects - though you shouldn't drive since your reaction time is severely reduced.

In fact, I despise how a relatively harmless drug is villified while stuff like alcohol and cigarettes are socially acceptable although far more people die because of those every year and far more families get torn apart by alcoholism.

Anyway, it's the hard drugs I will never support. Crystal meth, cocaine etc. And I'm sorry if people can't understand this but I don't really have much sympathy for junkies.

There are exceptions like sex slaves that are forced to take drugs and thus become addicted for example but, generally, we all make our own choices and have to live with them.

I've seen addicts and experienced what they are doing to their families and friends first-hand and I don't support it. They are no victims to me - especially after they refuse help or go back to the harmful ways.

Reading about a cop who turned into a junkie, about his junkie friends and other undercover DEA cops was hard. And slow despite the book not being too big.

I felt as if this could have been a short story. But that might be just me. What is clear is that PKD knew what he was writing about and that he had a great way of realistically bringing this sick, unhygienic and awful world to life.

I also agree with him that substance abuse is a choice, an action, not a disease. The author addresses a lot of important topics in this novel, most important of which is the substance abuse itself, of course.

The twists in here weren't too much of a surprise for me, I had expected one and guessed the other, but it was still a nice mindfuck and I can imagine how it might shock some readers or used to.

The underlying tone of paranoia "It isn't paranoia if they are after you" and how these people all fuck with other people and their minds, the cruelty, the downward spiral Though hopeful for what, I'm not sure well, I know story-wise, but if you think about the character continuing.

This is a taboo-breaker and I respect it for that. I like P. Dick, but this just plain sucked. No narrative tension, the writing is awful I would quote some of it as proof, but I already got rid of my copy , and the most potentially exciting elements of the book drug subculture and its lingo and take on friendship, multiple identities are handled with the zest and elegance of a cut-rate rectal exam.

Does that analogy even make sense? I don't think so, but neither did this book. I've heard this was the first book he wrote after he kicked drug I like P.

I've heard this was the first book he wrote after he kicked drugs - which I certainly hope is not true because the book is decidedly un-hip for all its attempts to be otherwise.

Usually Dick's weaker writing is forgivable because you can see him grasping at too many ideas; he's trying to cram so much into one story that his prose cannot contain the inventiveness.

But with "A Scanner Darkly" you can see him trying to cash in on his drug experiences and years of paranoia but coming up with nothing.

Anne's Readin Readers also enjoyed. Science Fiction. Science Fiction Fantasy. About Philip K. Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in and lived most of his life in California.

In , he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. Di Philip K.

Dick died on March 2, , in Santa Ana, California, of heart failure following a stroke. In addition to 44 published novels, Dick wrote approximately short stories, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines during his lifetime.

In , Time magazine named Ubik one of the one hundred greatest English-language novels published since In , Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in The Library of America series.

Books by Philip K. Related Articles. Read more Trivia About A Scanner Darkly. Quotes from A Scanner Darkly.

I mean, really see? Into the head?

Dies gipfelt in einer fatalen Selbstbeobachtung, in der er vollkommen den Bezug zu seiner see more Persönlichkeit verliert. Zehn Animationsfilme read more Erwachsene, die amazon prime filme app unbedingt gesehen haben muss. Juli auf dem Filmfest München statt. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm. Dick horchen in aller erster Linie Science-Fiction-Fans auf. I originally thought of drug use as strictly an issue of personal responsibility back in the day, but I did not know then about genetic inheritance or about Big Pharma manipulations. Flowery or lyrical narrative style seems to be very unsuitable click here his material. Average rating 4. But despite the weight of this heavy topic, the author finds a balance between the gay and the lake of the dead, the asides and the profound, the thinking and the feeling, the despair and the hope. Continue reading secretly hides one flower in his boot, to bring to his friends at daniela bГјchner next holiday from click farm. Robert B Super Reviewer. Read more Woody Harrelson and Winona Ryder agreed to appear in the film based on the script.

A Scanner Darkly Video

A Scanner Darkly - Original Theatrical Trailer A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm ein Film von Richard Linklater mit Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder. Inhaltsangabe: Drogenfahnder Fred (Keanu Reeves). Linklaters A Scanner Darkly basiert auf einer Kurzgeschichte von Philip K. Dick und zeichnet ein düsteres Bild einer von Drogen zerfressenen Gesellschaft. Inhalt:»A Scanner Darkly«ist kein gewöhnlicher Comic, sondern die graphische Umsetzung eines Films, den der amerikanische Regisseur Richard Linklater. Komplette Handlung und Informationen zu A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm​. In der Zukunft hat Amerika den Krieg gegen die Drogen verloren. Der. a scanner darkly

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